Avestan hymn to Mithra



Publisher: Cambridge University Press in Cambridge

Written in English
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Edition Notes

Statementwith an introduction, translation and commentary by Ilya Gershevitch.
SeriesUniversity of Cambridge oriental publications -- 4
ContributionsGershevitch, Ilya.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18866532M

The Avesta / ə ˈ v ɛ s t ə / is the primary collection of religious texts of Zoroastrianism, composed in Avestan language.. The Avesta texts fall into several different categories, arranged either by dialect, or by principal text in the liturgical group is the Yasna, which takes its name from the Yasna ceremony, Zoroastrianism's primary act of worship, and at which the Yasna text. Remarks on the Avestan hymn to Mithra Remarks on the Avestan hymn to Mithra Kuiper, F. B. J. REMARKS ON T H E A V E S T A N H Y M N T O M I T H R A by F. B. J. K U I P E R Leiden 1. The importance of Gershevitch's new translation of the tenth Yasht 1 of the Avesta transcends the interests of the specialists of Old Iranian philology and religion. The next major Younger Avestan text is a series of praise- hymns called the "Yashts," or "Worships." and Aban, the Waters, which features re-cycled hymns to the river goddess Ardvi Sura Anahita. And there is a great hymn to Mithra, the Mihr Yasht, which is devoted to the brilliant god-form of sunlight, right contracts, and friendship. Mithra (Miθra), (Persian, مِهر، میترا or میثره) is the Avestan language name of the Zoroastrian divinity (yazata) of covenant and oath. In addition to being the divinity of contracts, Mithra is also a judicial figure, an all-seeing protector of Truth, and the guardian of cattle, the harvest and of The Waters. In Middle Iranian languages (Middle Persian, Parthian etc.), 'Mithra.

Avesta est epitome sacrorum Zoroastrianismi operum, principale librorum religiosorum in usu inter Zoroastros corpus, in lingua Avestana, aliter ignota, compositum. Textus nonnulla genera varia exhibent, aut per dialectum aut per usum ordinata. Textus principalis in grege liturgico est Yasna, quae ex caerimonia eiusdem nominis appellatur, in maximo actu venerationis religionis Zoroastreae, cum. Mithra and Anahita play a role in the Avestan literature, which challenges the interpretations that have tried to explain both the Zoroast rian reform the religion practiced by the Achaemenid from. The Kayanians (also Kays, Kayanids or Kaianids, or Kiani) are a semi-mythological dynasty of Persian tradition and folklore which supposedly ruled after the ered collectively, the Kayanian kings are the heroes of the Avesta, the sacred texts of Zoroastrianism, and of the Shahnameh, Iran's national epic.. As an epithet of kings and the reason the dynasty is so called, Middle. Arshtat is an assayer of deeds at the Chinvat bridge, the bridge of judgement that all souls must cross. in Bundahishn (–14), Arshtat plays this role together with the Amesha Spenta Ameretat, of whom Arshtat is a hamkar "co-operator"; and in the Book of Arda Wiraz (), she stands there with Mithra, Rashnu, Vayu-Vata, and Verethragna.

The Avestan Hymn to Mithra (Yasht 10) is the longest, and one of the best preserved, of the Yashts. (Book of Common Prayer) also refer to Mithra in the Litany to the Sun, "Homage to Mithra of Wide Cattle Pastures,"(Khwarshed Niyayesh 5). Like Mitra, Mithra saw all things. The Avestan Yast (hymn) dedicated to him describes him as having a thousand ears, ten thousand eyes, and as never sleeping. And like Mitra, Mithra has a partner, Apam Nepat, whose name means Grandson of Waters. MITHRA. Ahura Mazd ā and together with An ā hit ā, Mithra is one of the major deities of ancient Iran, one that later crossed the borders of the Iranian world to become the supreme god of a mystery religion popular throughout the Roman the Avesta and the later Zoroastrian literature Mithra turns up frequently; indeed, an entire Avestan hymn is dedicated to him (Yashts. Aziloth books (1) Kessinger pub (52) Taylor and francis (9) Createspace independent publishing platform (16) Routledge (9) Cambridge university press (7) Kessinger publishing co (12) Literary licensing, llc (3) Bibliolife (4) I.b. tauris (4) Unknown (5) Bloomsbury publishing (2) Book jungle (4).

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Book Description. The Avestan Hymn to Mithra, written in the fifth century BC, is the one extensive, ancient literary record of the attributes, companions and cult of the Iranian god whose worship spread, five or six centuries later, as far as Britain.

Dr Gershevitch here reproduces Geldner's text and critical apparatus of the Hymn, adding his own introduction, translation and by: Hymn to Mithra, from Avesta, the Sacred Book of the Zoroastrians: Khorda Avesta (Book of Common Prayer).

The Avestan Hymn to Mithra, written in the fifth century BC, is the one extensive, ancient literary record of the attributes, companions and cult of the Iranian god whose worship spread, five or six centuries later, as far as : Ilya Gershevitch.

The Avestan Hymn to Mithra, written in the fifth century BC, is the one extensive, ancient literary record of the attributes, companions and cult of the Iranian god whose worship spread, five or six centuries later, as far as Britain.4/5(2).

The Avestan Hymn to Mithra, written in the fifth century BC, is the one extensive, ancient literary record of the attributes, companions and cult of the Iranian god whose worship spread, five or six centuries later, as far as Britain. The Avestan Hymn to Mithra, written in the fifth century BC, is the one extensive, ancient literary record of the attributes, companions and cult of the Iranian god whose worship spread, five or six Dr Gershevitch here reproduces Geldner's text and critical apparatus of the Hymn, adding his own introduction, translation and commentary.

Based on AVESTA – Hymn to Mithra (1 to 21) 1) Lord Wisdom spake unto Spitama Zarathustra, saying: 'Verily, when I created Mithra, the lord of wide pastures, O Spitama.

I created him as worthy of sacrifice, as worthy of prayer as myself Lord Wisdom. 2) 'The ruffian who lies unto Mithra brings death unto. Books Online Overview Directions for Historical Linguistics Overview Editor's Note 1. Lehmann 2.

Malkiel 3. Kurylowicz 4. Benveniste 5. Weinreich et al. Index Grammar of Proto-Germanic Contents. Hymns to Mithra. Vedic Hymns to Mitra. Rig Veda, Book I, Hymn XLI Varuṇa, Mitra, Aryaman Book I, Hymn XX A prayer to Soma, the Maruts, Mitra, and Varuna, for protection Hymns to Mitra from the Sama Veda.

Avestan Hymn to Mithra. Mihr Yasht. Hymn of the XXX Legion, circa A.D. by Rudyard Kipling. A Song to Mithras. Musical Tribute.

Yashts (Hymns to Ahura Mazda, the Archangels, and the Angels) 1. Ohrmazd Yasht (Hymn to Ahura Mazda): Transcription font: Avestan font: 2. Haft Amahraspand Yasht (Hymn to the 7 Archangels): Transcription font. In his book, The Avestan Hymn to Mithra (Cambridge University Press, ), Ilya Gershevitch cites Mitra's characteristics as summarized by A.

Macdonell in A Vedic Reader for Students (Oxford University Press, ). Especially pertinent among these, for the interpretation of the initial stanzas of the hymn that are included here, is his role as upholder of truth, order, and contracts.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Avesta. Yashts. Avestan hymn to Mithra. Cambridge [England] University Press, [] (OCoLC) Hymn to Mithra, from Avesta, the Sacred Book of the Zoroastrians: Khorda Avesta (Book of Common Prayer) Back. Avesta: Khorda Avesta MIHR YASHT ("Hymn to Mithra") Translated by James Darmesteter (From Sacred Books of the East, American Edition, ) T.

Ilya Gershevitch is the author of The Avestan Hymn to Mithra ( avg rating, 3 ratings, 0 reviews, published ), A grammar of Manichean Sogdian ( Home My Books/5. The Avesta: Book Ten; the MIHIR YAST, contains Hymns composed for the Persian Mithra.

MIHIR YAST. The Rig Veda contains Hymns composed to Mitra and Mitra / Soma together. These links provide you with more in depth information.

Avesta -- Zoroastrian Archives. Avesta Sacred Texts. Wikipedia - Avesta. Wikipedia - Avestan. Mithra temple London. (See I. Gershevitch, The Avestan Hymn to Mithra.) Yt. 11 (23 verses) and Yt. 12 (47 verses) are dedicated to Sraoša and Rašnu, attendants of Miθra. 13 ( verses) to.

Buy The Avestan Hymn to Mithra by Ilya Gershevitch from Waterstones today. Click and Collect from your local Waterstones or get FREE UK delivery on orders over £Author: Ilya Gershevitch.

"Remarks on the Avestan hymn to Mithra" published on 01 Jan by by: 7. REMARKS ON THE AVESTAN HYMN TO MITHRA nominatives (G, p. ), there is no need and hence no justification for changing them into instrumentals.where the instrumentals are actually used, is construed differently: Yt. dtaraOra fraorisyeiti mi6ro.

Selection of hymns in part meant to highlight the similarities between Mithra and the Celtic god Lug. Help support my work, establish a sanctuary and.

item 5 The Avestan Hymn to Mithra by Ilya Gershevitch (English) Paperback Book Free Shi - The Avestan Hymn to Mithra by Ilya Gershevitch (English) Paperback Book Free Shi. $ Free shipping. See all 5.

No ratings or reviews yet. Be the first to write a review. Best Selling in Nonfiction. REMARKS ON THE AVESTAN HYMN TO MITHRA by F. KUIPER Leiden 1. The importance of Gershevitch's new translation of the tenth Yasht1 of the Avesta transcends the interests of the specialists of Old Iranian philology and religion.

The god to whom this hymn is devoted has a claim to a more general interest, from the students of the Vedic and. Like Mitra, Mithra saw all things. The Avestan Yast (hymn) dedicated to him describes him as having a thousand ears, ten thousand eyes, and as never sleeping. And like Mitra, Mithra has a partner, Apam Nepat, whose name means Grandson of Waters.

(Note that the same elemental connection of fire and water is maintained as in the Indian tradition. The Avestan Hymn to Mithra (Yasht 10) is the longest, and one of the best preserved, of the Yashts.

Mithra is described in the Zoroastrian Avesta scriptures as "Mithra of. The chief allies of Ahura Mazda were the “Amentas Spenta.” Created by the “Wise Lord,” these “Bounteous” or “Holy Immortals” included Mithra. There was a hymn to Mithra in the Zarathustrian holy work, the Avesta.

It is a beautiful hymn or Yast, and Ilya Gershevitch is. Also, the 10th hymn in the YASHTs or “adoration songs” in Avesta; is dedicated to Mithra. This Avestan hymn to Mithra is one of the most poetic and beautiful portions of the Avesta after the enchanting gathas; and provides the most comprehensive information/record on Mithra among all indo-european sources.

Yashts (Hymns to Ahura Mazda, the Archangels, and the Angels) 1. Ohrmazd Yasht (Hymn to Ahura Mazda): Transcription font: Avestan font; 2. Haft Amahraspand Yasht (Hymn to the 7 Archangels): Transcription font.

I read this book during my quest for the source of religious beliefs, as in Christianity. There are many traditions in Mithraism that mirror Xianity, if it is not the source of; for example the holidays like December 25 and Easter come from the birthday of Mithra.

Mithra was the son of /5(38). The Khorda Avesta (Book of Common Prayer) also refer to Mithra in the Litany to the Sun, "Homage to Mithra of Wide Cattle Pastures," (Khwarshed Niyayesh 5), "Whose Word is True, who is of the Assembly, Who has a Thousand Ears, the Well-Shaped One, Who has Ten Thousand Eyes, the Exalted One, Who has Wide Knowledge, the Helpful One, Who Sleeps Not, the Ever Wakeful.

We sacrifice to Mithra. The Gathas of Zarathushtra and Other Old Avestan Texts, by Helmut Humbach (2 vols., Heidelberg: Winter), is more inclusive. See also The Avestan Hymn to Mithra, by Ilya Gershevitch (Cambridge University Press, ); and Avesta: The Sacred Books of the Parsis by Karl F.

Geldner (3 vols., Stuttgart: Kohlhammer, ), with the text in the. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Later printing. Boards. 8vo, green boards, dust jacket, pages.

Very Good + / Very Good +. Item #42 Important study by a major scholar of this hymn to Mithra, an important early rival to is generally fine though has slight wear.[Note: The Avestan “Hymn to Mithra” can be recited here (see appendix A).] As the first rays of the sun come over the distant mountain and fall into the vast valley beneath, you see in the distance heading toward you a golden chariot driven by four white horses: MITHRA.

On Mithra and Mithraism. October 2 nd marks the beginning of Mithrá festival culminating on October 8 is a most happy festival of love, red wine, pomegranates, nuts and amore. The name of the Indo-Aryan god-force (Avestan Mithrá, Vedic Mitrá,) is based on the common noun mitrá “to mediate, bring about a meeting of spirits/minds, mutual understanding, agreement.” (Compare with.